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TIRE INFORMATION

One morning, as you walk up to your car, you notice that your tire’s tread isn’t what it used to be, and you see that you may need new tires. Where do you start? Purchasing tires can be an expensive investment. Do you really need to purchase new tires, or can you have your current tires repaired or rotated? Even though you should have your tires rotated every 6,000 miles (or every other oil change), it’s recommended that you perform the “Penny Test” on your tires at home. Place a penny, head first, in the groove of your tires. If you’re able to see the top of Lincoln’s head, you should consider replacing your tires.

So, if you need new tires, where should you start? Replacing tires is never a cheap expense. You want to make sure that you’re going to invest in tires that will last you at least 5 years. Below are a few things that you need to know before you purchase your next set of tires.

The first thing you need to do is find out what kind of tires are right for your car. You can find this information one of two ways. First, look in your car’s Owner’s Manual to see the recommended tire size for your car. Second, you can look at the code on your current tire.

In the manual and on the car’s tires, you’ll see a line of letters and numbers. Why is this important? What pieces of information do you need to take away from this? That’s where our passion for finding your perfect tires comes in. Below is a piece-by-piece explanation of what that code means and why it is important for you to understand.

The first thing you’ll likely see is the letter “P” at the beginning of the code. This letter describes the Tire Type. The “P” at the beginning of the tire size tells us that the tire is intended for Passenger vehicles. On some tires, you may see the letters, “LT.” This means that the tire is intended for “Light Trucks.” These type of tires generally require higher inflation pressures than the “Passenger” tires.

To the right of the first letter, you’ll see something like “205/55.” The first three-digit number in the tire size refers to the Tire Width. The Tire Width is the width of the tire measured in millimeters, from sidewall to sidewall. For our example, the tire’s width is 205 mm wide.

After the Tire Width, you’ll see a two-digit number, known as the Aspect Ratio. The Aspect Ratio is the ratio of the height of the tire’s cross-section to its width. For our example, our tire’s Aspect Ratio is “55”. The “55” means that the height of the tire is equal to 55% of the tire’s width. The larger the aspect ratio, the taller the tire.

After we’ve figured out our Aspect Ratio, we see the tire’s Construction. More times than not, you’ll see the letter “R” on your tire. This indicates that tire’s Construction is “Radial” (or radial-ply). All this means is that the design of this tire’s cord plies are arranged at 90 degrees to the direction of travel, or radially (from the center of the tire).

After the tire’s Construction, we see the a two-digit number. For our example, we see “16.” This indicates the wheel’s diameter (or Rim Diameter) in inches. This may go without saying, but we want our tires to fit the wheel, so we need to ensure that we note the recommended wheel diameter for the tires we want to purchase.

After the Rim Diameter, we should see another two-digit number, followed by a letter. The number indicates the tire’s Load Index, and the letter indicates the Speed Rating.

The Load Index, or Load Rating, allows us to understand the tire’s relative load carrying capabilities. For our example, we see that our tire’s Load Index is “91”, meaning that our tire can carry approximately 1,356 lbs. The higher the tire’s Load Index, the greater its load carrying capacity.

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 71

    761

    345

  • 72

    783

    355

  • 73

    805

    365

  • 74

    827

    375

  • 75

    853

    387

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 76

    882

    400

  • 77

    908

    412

  • 78

    937

    425

  • 79

    963

    437

  • 80

    992

    450

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 81

    1,019

    462

  • 82

    1,047

    475

  • 83

    1,074

    487

  • 84

    1,102

    500

  • 85

    1,135

    515

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 86

    1,168

    530

  • 87

    1,201

    545

  • 88

    1,235

    560

  • 89

    1,279

    580

  • 90

    1,323

    600

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 91

    1,356

    615

  • 92

    1,389

    630

  • 93

    1,433

    650

  • 94

    1,477

    670

  • 95

    1,521

    690

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 96

    1,565

    710

  • 97

    1,609

    730

  • 98

    1,653

    750

  • 99

    1,709

    775

  • 100

    1,764

    800

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 101

    1,819

    825

  • 102

    1,874

    850

  • 103

    1,929

    875

  • 104

    1,984

    900

  • 105

    2,039

    925

  • Load Index

    Pounds

    Kilograms

  • 106

    2,094

    950

  • 107

    2,149

    975

  • 108

    2,205

    1,000

  • 109

    2,271

    1,030

  • 110

    2,337

    1,060

Lastly, we see that our tire’s Speed Rating is “S”. The Speed Rating allows us understand the maximum speed a tire can handle, So for our example, our tire should be able to handle approximately 112 mph on cars and minivans.

  • Speed Rating

    (KM/H)

    (MPH)

  • A1

    5

    3

  • A2

    10

    6

  • A3

    15

    9

  • A4

    20

    12

  • A5

    25

    16

  • A6

    30

    19

  • A7

    35

    22

  • A8

    40

    25

  • B

    50

    31

  • C

    60

    37

  • Speed Rating

    (KM/H)

    (MPH)

  • D

    65

    40

  • E

    70

    43

  • F

    80

    50

  • G

    90

    56

  • J

    100

    62

  • K

    110

    68

  • L

    120

    75

  • M

    130

    81

  • N

    140

    87

  • P

    150

    94

  • Speed Rating

    (KM/H)

    (MPH)

  • Q

    160

    100

  • R

    170

    106

  • S

    180

    112

  • T

    190

    118

  • U

    200

    124

  • H

    210

    130

  • V

    240

    149

  • W

    270

    168

  • Y

    300

    186

  • (Y)

    300+

    186+


It’s that easy! Of course, if you have any other questions, feel free to reach out to the Savannah Tire store nearest you or contact us, and we’ll be more than happy to help you out.

Finding the right tire for your car isn’t complicated, and we’re excited for the opportunity to serve you. Remember to take advantage of the variety of rebates that we are running throughout the year. What’s better than finding your perfect tire and receiving a rebate?

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